We provide information about usage and lifespan –

So you know how to deal with timber properly.

The natural product of wood has specific properties. If you are familiar with them, this will help you keep your product in perfect condition for years to come. So take a moment to read through our general information and tips – it is worth it!

Effects of weather on timber

Effects of weather on timber

Wood can offer a long service life if a few basic rules are borne in mind. This includes the use of long-lasting species of wood such as Douglas fir and larch. Their heartwood contains constituents which are toxic to pest organisms and so act as a natural preservative.

Natural reactions of wood to weathering:

  • Emission of resin
  • Graying of the surface
  • Change in shape / development of fissures

A preventive coating as additional protection of our Outdoor wood® products is always advantageous. It reduces graying and development of fissures and increases resistance against weather exposure.

Structural timber protection

Structural timber protection

Besides the individual species of wood selected and its natural durability, the service life of timber can be significantly influenced by structural timber protection. If wood is exposed to high levels of moisture for lengthy periods, it will be damaged by fungal decay. This can be prevented by the proper planning of structural measures to protect the wood at the execution stage.

Where possible, upright, load-bearing timber components should never come into direct contact with the ground. To protect them from splashing, it is advisable to maintain a minimum gap of approx. 15 cm (mounting on supports).

Horizontal wooden structures should likewise avoid any direct contact with the ground and be kept a sufficient distance from the subsoil. To prevent water from collecting, terraces should always have a slight gradient of 2% .

Measures to extend the durability of wooden constructions

Measures to extend the durability of wooden constructions

We now have a few practical recommendations which will
length the life of your dream terrace and ensure many years
of enjoyment in your new favourite place!

  • Installation of decks always with 2% slope longitudinal to profile for water to run off
  • Use stainless steel screws
  • Avoid direct ground contact
  • Avoid stagnant moisture
  • Keep contact between joists and deck as small as possible or use spacers
  • Keep 5-8 mm gaps between decking planks and at the ends
  • Don't perform metal works like grinding or sanding on your wooden deck (staining)
  • Clean and maintain your wooden structure regulary (depending on weather 1-2 times per year)

Proper fastening and surface treatment

Proper fastening and surface treatment

Fastening timber components is best carried out using stainless steel screws that will not rust. When working with galvanised screws, the layer of zinc may become damaged. This can lead to corrosion and cause the wood to discolour. In addition, species of wood such as Douglas fir, larch or Bangkirai which are rich in tannin react to contact with iron, with the timber becoming darker.

Wood used outdoors is permanently exposed to the weather and the effects of UV radiation and rain. This brings about changes in the chemical composition of the timber, causing constituents to wash out. The timber turns grey in the course of a natural process. Surface treatment with suitable coatings can offer a relative degree of protection from moisture and UV rays. Wood has to be painted regularly – at least twice a year – to maintain the appearance and effectiveness of the coating.

Use classes for wood and wood-based products according to DIN EN 335-1

Use classes for wood and wood-based products according to DIN EN 335-1

The life of outdoor timber can be significantly extended by applying the principles of structural wood protection. If they are disregarded, conditions at the installation site (high humidity levels, exposure to water, lack of ventilation, etc.) may decrease the expected period of usage. Favourable conditions on the other hand, e. g. no direct contact with the ground, protection and cover, can significantly lengthen service life.

Classification of the durability of wood

Classification of the durability of wood

When it comes to the resistance of heartwood to wood-destroying fungi for timber components in contact with the ground, there is a classification system which offers our customers a good overview of the service life for selected species of wood and their modified products.

This information is however merely a guide to life expectancy under temperate climatic conditions for the individual classes in relation to each other. It is not possible to provide exact values for any specific service life as this greatly depends on local conditions and the measures taken to protect the wood. This therefore does not constitute any guarantee or warranty on our part.



Flaws

blemish

Flaws

Our solid wood products are subject to strict quality criteria (in accordance with the “Tegernsee customs”). Depending on the species of wood, individual timber profiles may naturally display a range of colours. This varying range of colours gives the product a vibrant appearance and underscores the natural, individual nature of wood; it is not a sorting criterion.  
 
Natural weathering influences, such as sun, moisture and UV radiation, have different effects on wood, dependent on its species. Cracks may form, but these do not have any influence on durability. Splitting is a natural characteristic of wood and not grounds for complaint.
 
Depending on the species of wood, its origin, and growth-related influences, the quantity and size of knots will vary.
These are not faults, and their quantity and size  are not limited. Individually knocked-out edge knots and cracks in the area of the knot cannot always be avoided, and these have no influence on the durability of the timber. The same applies to colour-treated timbers. Wood is a natural, “working” material.
As such, dimensional changes to timber profiles may occur under the influence of ambient moisture, causing variation in the thickness and width (up to 10%). This behaviour is known as swelling and shrinking, and should be taken into consideration when planning.
 
The profile and plank dimensions stated are calculated dimensions which, in terrace construction, can vary from the actual dimensions by up to 5 cm in the length and up to 1 cm in the width.
 
In naturally grown materials, moderate – and, in isolated cases, severe – warping may occur. Ensuring the correct distance from the substructure may counteract warping. Terrace boards that are already warped may be “cut clean”. Cutting boards on-site can prevent warping. It is not possible for the entire length of every plank to be free from warping.